Glencoe Waterfalls

The Glencoe Waterfalls were my catch-all term for the handful of waterfalls that we happened to have noticed while we were driving through the scenic Glencoe Valley. We actually visited the valley…

Falls of Falloch

The Falls of Falloch (Eas Falloch in Scottish Gaelic; meaning the Hidden Falls) was a short excursion waterfall that we made a stop for as we were making the drive from Fort William to Stirling Castle

Steall Falls

Steall Falls was a very beautiful waterfall ostensibly tumbling 120m into a wide open scenic valley backed by tall mountains. It’s said to be Scotland’s second highest waterfall so if true…

Plodda Falls

Plodda Falls (Eas Plodda in Gaelic) was a very tall 46m high waterfall that we did as a side excursion somewhat out of the way from the busy northern or western shores of Loch Ness…

Falls of Foyers

The Falls of Foyers (Eas na Smuide in Scottish Gaelic meaning the Smoking Falls; pronounced “es-nuh-SMOOD-yuh”) was a very attractive waterfall at the small hamlet of Foyers on the quieter eastern…

Rogie Falls

Rogie Falls was actually a bonus waterfall that Julie and I hadn’t even counted on seeing when we made plans to visit Scotland in August 2014. In fact, we didn’t even know it existed! However…

Mealt Falls

Mealt Falls was certainly one of those waterfalls with that “Wow!” factor as it had a lot going for it, especially in light of the fact that we made our visit on a near perfect weather day…

Bride’s Veil Waterfall

The Brides Veil Waterfall (or Bride’s Veil Waterfall) was a roadside waterfall that was a worthwhile photo stop not only because it was an attractive cascade that can be composed in many different…

Falls of Measach (Corrieshalloch Gorge)

The Falls of Measach was the 46m waterfall at the head of the mile-long box canyon known as the Corrieshalloch Gorge. In addition to being my waterfalling excuse to explore the deep Corrieshalloch…

“Ardvreck Castle Waterfall”

The ‘Ardvreck Castle Waterfall’ was what I’m dubbing this unexpected waterfall surprise that we just so happened to notice when we stumbled upon the equally unexpected surprise of the ruins of…

Eas a’ Chual Aluinn

The Eas a’ Chual Aluinn was the bastardized Gaelic name of what has been widely reported to be Great Britain’s highest above-surface waterfall at 658ft (about 200m). The actual Gaelic name was said…

Smoo Cave

Smoo Cave was supposed to be one of the more unusual waterfalling excursions in that we were well aware that it featured a waterfall spilling into a pothole deep inside the cave itself. However…

Clashnessie Waterfall

The Clashnessie Waterfall was our waterfalling reason to take the deceptively long (and dangerous) out-and-back detour from the Loch Assynt vicinity towards the tranquil town and bay of Clashnessie…

Falls of Glomach

The Falls of Glomach had to have been one of those waterfalls that I needed to earn with a bit of an adventure. Not only did I have to partake in a long and nearly all-day hike full of hazards…

Falls of Bruar

The Falls of Bruar were a series of at least three pretty significant waterfalls (at least that’s how many we counted) each with a distinct character all their own. The cumulative height of all…

Black Spout

The Black Spout Waterfall was a pleasant waterfalling diversion from the shopping, golfing, and the whisky tasting that the town of Pitlochry seemed to be known for. In fact, it was possible…

Falls of Moness (Birks of Aberfeldy)

The Falls of Moness were a series of waterfalls on the Moness Burn in the Birks of Aberfeldy (Birches of Aberfeldy), which was also made famous in a poem by Scottish poet Robert Burns…

Gray Mare’s Tail

The Gray Mares Tail (or Gray Mare’s Tail) was a dramatic 60m waterfall said to be the fifth highest in the United Kingdom. While the waterfall itself was very impressive, we felt that the steep…

Falls of Clyde

The Falls of Clyde (we’re not talking about the ship here) were a series of three main waterfalls consisting of the Dundaff Linn, Cora Linn (pictured above), and the Bonnington Linn. All of these…